Origin Story: Planner Without the Pressure

Brave Sis was borne out of necessity, and a call from the foremothers.

From our founder:

At the cusp of a new decade, I was finding the "planner" market pretty dispiriting. All the samples I was finding on the market were for someone else. Some were cheerfully intended for white moms in the suburbs, and I am an internationally minded, urban empty-nester. 

On the other hand, the “black girl” products were working too hard — or worse, felt like someone had taken the most basic book and stuck some "you go, girls" onto it as a selling tool. That felt rude! Others were terse; were their users even human? The new-agey ones seemed to require course study to even operate.

I didn’t want someone dictating the spiritual path I might take to deeper awareness, which eliminated huge portions of the inventory. The “success” planners had a disappointing manliness to them — one, literally cited quotes from some fairly odious men as their selling point. I had no plans to invite these patriarchal dudes into my house in any format, much less through a process of intimate exploration and truth-telling! 

I picked up one book that was so blank and morose and cheap, I got both angry and sad at the same time. I deserved, we all deserve, better than that! 

A bunch skewed too deliberately young; given that my college-age daughters and I share many interests across our generations, I saw a case for universality without so much "Hey, Boomer" imprinting and vitriolic nonsense. 

Another immediately invited me to fail: how could I keep track of or commit to 52 weeks of color-coding, stickers, and dots? Yet another broke me out in sweats because I kept getting lost in the ten-page introduction. Quotes, yoga poses, recipes, water logs, trackers of all the things told me “sis, you’re gonna blow this, so don’t even try.”

I guess I didn’t want it all served up to me so much; I wanted a place to explore for, and by, myself. 

You know what they say; if you can’t find it, build it. 

And so, Brave Sis 2021. My book, and ours. A conversation across centuries and through a year.

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published